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Full text of "Report on the working of the State Railways Coal Department"

REPORT 



ON THE 

WORKING OF THE 
STATE RAILWAYS COAL 
DEPARTMENT 



For the Calendar year 1913 



By R W. CHURCH, Esq, B.Sc, F.G.S., 
Mining Engineer and MitoUu with the Railway Boa*d. 




SIMLA 

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL BRANCI I'RESS 
1914 



[Price one Rupee.] 



THE UNIVERSITY 
OF ILLINOIS 
LIBRARY 



X ^ ^ 



LIBRARY • 
OF THE 
rmtVERSm OF ILLINOIS 




REPORT 



ON THE 



WORKING OF THE 
STATE RAILWAYS COAL 
DEPARTMENT 



For the Calendar year 1913 



By R. W. CHURCH, Esq., B.Sc, F.G.S., 
Mining Engineer and Metallurgist with the Railway Board. 




SIMLA 

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL BRANCH PRESS 
1914 



S6BB 



No. 1639. 

From 

The MINING ENGINEER to the RAILWAY BOARD, 



To 

The SECRETARY, RAILWAY BOARD, SIMLA. 

Dated Simla, the 10th Jane 1914. 

Dear Sir, 



0 



290765 



No. 1639. 

From 

The MINING ENGINEER to the RAILWAY BOARD, 

To 

The SECRETARY, RAILWAY BOARD, SIMLA. 

Dated Simla, the 10th June 19/4. 

Dear Sir, 

I beg to submit this Report on the Working of the State Railways Coal 
Department for the year ending 31st December 19 13 for the information of the 
Board. 

The Report for the year 191 2 was issued in November last, but in future 
Reports will be submitted as soon as possible after the end of the year under 
review. 

Yours faithfully, 
R. W. CHURCH, 

Mining Engineer. 



290765 



\ 



STATE RAILWAYS COAL DEPARTMENT. 



Staff. 

Mining Engineer and Metallurgist with the Railway Board, 
R. W. CHURCH, B.Sc, F.G.S. 

State Railways Coal Superintendent. 
D. THOMSON. 

Assistant Coal Superintendents, 

C. S. WHITWORTH. 
J. J. MARSHALL. 

P. A. RUSSELL. 

D. SELLERS. 
J. THOMAS. 

{Corrected up to December 1913.) 



S5RB 



CONTENTS. 

Page. 

1. Introductory Chapter ... ... ... ... ... i 

2. Reports on collieries ... ... ... ••• ... I 

3. Tender Forms ... ... ... ... ••• 1 

4. Wagon supplies at the Collieries ... ... ... ... I 

5. Accidents in the Coal-fields ••• ••• ••• ••< 2 

6. Railborne despatches during I9'3 ••• ••• ■ ••• •" 2 

7. Seaborne despatches during 1913 ... ... ... ... 2 

8. Imports of foreign coal ... ... ... ... ••• 3 

9. Exports of Indian coal ... ... ••• ••• ••• 3 

10. Singareni ... ... ... ... ••• ••• 3 

11. Standardisation of Screening Tests ... ... ••• ••• 3 

12. Use of Coke on Indian Railways ... ... ... 4 

13. Screened small coal ... ... ... ... ... 4 

14. Soft Coke ... ... ... ... ••• ••• 4 

15. Spontaneous Combustion of Coal ... ... ... ... 5 

16. Purchases during 1913 ... ... ... ... ... 6 

17. Coal Mining in India during 1913 ... ... ... ... 7 

18. Government Laboratory at Alipore— Calcutta ... ... ... 7 

19. Inspection work outside the Bengal and Chota Nagpur coalfields ... 8 

20. Staff changes during year ... ... ... ... 3 

Appendix. 

1. Statement showing total coal mined in India, Foreign coal imported, coal 

used on Railways, and coal exported for the years 1 904-191 3 ... 19 

2. Statement showing tonnage of railborne coal inspected for Indian Rail- 

ways during 19 13 ... ... ... ... ... II 

3. Statement showing tonnage of seaborne coal inspected for Indian Rail- 

ways during 1913 ... ... ... ... ... 12 

4. Total amounts of coal inspected for Indian Railways during years 191 1- 

1913 — ... ... .» 13 

5. Statement of collieries inspected during 1913 ... ... ... 13 

6. Copies of forms of tenders for ■ ^""^ coal to the State Worked Rail- 

ways ... ... ... ... ... ... 14 

■* 

7. Index of colliery sidings ... ... ... ... 20 

Maps and Diagrams. 

Map 1. Showing routing of railborne coal and areas in which seaborne coal is 
used. 

„ 2. Principal coal bearing areas and connected railways and projects ... 

„ 3. Sidings in Jharria coal field (Index to sidings sec Appendix 7) 

„ 4. Sidings in Raneeganj coal field (Index to sidings see Appendix 7) ... 

Diagram 1. Total coal mined in India and consumed on Railways for the 
years 1904- 191 3. 



LIBRARY 
OF THE 



X. Introductory Chapter. 

This report deals with the work of the Department during the year 1913. 
While several of the Chapters are not solely concerned with the question 
of the supplies of locomotive fuel for Indian Railways their great importance to 
the coal trade and incidentally to railways seems to justify their inclusion. 

In addition to the quantities of coal inspected shown in Appendices 2 and 
3 the coal supplies for the British India Steam Navigation Company were in 
charge of this Department during the year under review. 

For 1 914, in addition to Indian Railway supplies, coal for the British India 
Steam Navigation Company, Ceylon Government Railway, Bombay Port Trust, 
and Bombay Electric Supply and Tramways Company is being inspected by 
this Department. 

2. Reports on Collieries. 

A complete list of all the collieries inspected was included in the First Report 
on the working of the Coal Department issued in November 191 3. In the year 
now under review a number of other collieries were inspected and a list of these 
collieries is given as an Appendix to this report. Every colliery of the slightest 
importance in the Raneeganj and Jharria coal fields has now been inspected, 
and the Department is in possession of full particulars of the seams worked, 
quality of coal, etc. 

Without exception colliery owners have welcomed inspection and have made 
no difficulties about exhibiting their mine plans to the officers of the Department. 
In many cases suggestions relating to the better working of collieries have been 
made to the owners and managers and in some instances colliery owners have 
been required to alter their systems of surface haulage, chiefly in cases where the 
old system allowed of mixing of coals from different seams of varying qualities. 

3. Tender Forms. 

The State Railway Forms of Tender for the supply of seaborne and rail- 
borne coal were revised during the year, and the revised forms are in force for 
the contracts concluded for 1914, These forms now in use are reproduced as 
an Appendix to this report. The principal changes are the reduction of the 
optional coal from 10 per cent, to 5 per cent, of the contract quantities and the 
provision for arbitration in certain eventualities. 

4. Wagon Supplies at the Collieries. 

Apart from the partial failure of the traffic in general merchandise and 
grain during 191 3 two factors operated to ease the situation in the coal fields 
in regard to the supply of wagons. One was the series of agreements arrived at 
as a result of the Conference in Calcutta in February at which Sir H. P. Burt 
presided. In consequence of these agreements between the East Indian Railway 
as the carrier and the North Western, Eastern Bengal, Great Indian Peninsula 
and Bombay, Baroda and Central India Railways upwards of five thousand broad 
gauge wagons were placed on the former line for the carriage of loco coal, thus 
increasing the number of East Indian wagons for public coal traffic. 

The other factor was the heavy influx of new wagons during the year, 
which for the East Indian Railway alone amounted to over 1900 wagons to the 
end of December 1 9 1 3. 

The actual additions for each of the lines serving the coal fields were as 

follows : — 



«9'3 


East Indian 
■ Railway. 


Bengal Nagpur 
Railway. 


1st Quarter 
2nd „ 
3rd 

4th „ 








333 
645 
189 

745 


'SO 

207 

2 37 






Total 




1,912 


699 



55RB 



a 



In all 22,343 broad guagc wagons have been ordered for delivery to Indian 
Railways by the end of 1915, 9,473 of which are for the East Indian Railway 
and 1,845 for the Bengal Nagpur Railway. 

In September 1913 on the East Indian Railway Administration representing 
that the existing agreements respecting the hire of wagons for loco coal traffic 
were operating to that railway's great disadvantage, fresh agreements were made 
reducing the r.ite of hire to be paid for foreign wagons at certain times of the 
year. These agreements are now in force and although irregularities occasionally 
occur they may be said to have greatly simplified the arrangements for the 
supply of locomotive coal to Railways. 

5. Accidents in the Coal Fields. 

These are divided into two classes : — 

1. Explosions. 

2. Floods. 

Explosions. — The only explosion which affected coal supplies to railways 
was that at Chourassie colliery (Equitable Coal Company) which happened on 
the 23rd October 191 3. This explosion resulted in the whole colliery being 
closed down, but arrangements were made for the supply of other coals by 
contractors. 

Floods. — In the second week of August 1913 the floods which affected all 
Bengal were very severe in the coal fields, 22 inches of rain falling in three days. 
Many mines were entirely flooded and those which escaped this had to resort 
to extensive pumping. 

This was more particularly the case in the Jharria field where mines are close 
together and where there is no system of surface drainage to keep surface water 
from entering the workings either in areas where subsidence of the surface has 
taken place or through workings near the outcrops of the seams. The East 
Indian Railway line was breached between Dhanbaid and Moghalsarai and at 
Burdwan, and supplies of coal to all railways were affected but on resumption 
of traffic most of the collieries which held railway contracts re-commenced 
despatching coal. Several collieries were very severely affected by this flood and 
under clause 7 of our contract these were given extended time to complete 
deliveries in cases where the contracts were not cancelled at the owners' requests. 

One of the most serious effects of the floods as far as coal supplies were 
concerned was that several collieries were obliged to work other sections of their 
seams than those ordinarily worked, until the dip workings were cleared of water!. 
What generally happened was that bottom coal was worked in the rise galleries 
and this coal particularly in No. 14 seam Jharria was found to be of very inferior 
quality. When the attention of the various managing agents concerned was 
drawn to this, despatches of the inferior coal were stopped, but a very careful 
investigation into the value of the whole thickness of Jharria seams has been 
commenced, particularly of those seams which are usually looked upon as of 1st 
class quality. If these inferior sections are not shut out by colliery owners it will 
be necessary to provide a minimum calorific value and maximum ash content for 
coal in the form of contract, with suitable penalties if inferior coal is detected 
in despatches. 

6. Railborne Despatches during 1913. 

The total quantity of railborne coal inspected on behalf of Indian Railways 
during 1 91 3 amounted to 2,092,66s tons as against 2,308,041 tons for 19 1 2. 
The decrease is principally due to the smaller quantities taken by the North- 
Western, Eastern Bengal, and Great Indian Peninsula Railways. A statement 
of despatches is given in Appendix 2 of this report. 

7. Seaborne Despatches during 1913. 

During the year 214 cargoes amounting to 835,452 tons were inspected at 
Kidderpore Docks on behalf of Indian Railways as compared with 180 car- 
goes of 698,21 7 tons for the previous year. The increased quantity for the year 



3 



is due to 28 cargoes for the Burma Railways having been inspected as against 
5 cargoes for 1912, and to larger qauntities of seaborne coal having been taken by 
the Great Indian Peninsula and Assam Bengal Railways. A statement of des- 
patches is given in Appendix 3 of this report. 

8. Imports of Foreign Coal. 

From 1904 to 1911 imports of foreign coal into India did not appreciably 
increase, the average during these years being about 300,000 tons. As will be 
seen from Appendix I, there were very large increases in 1912 and 1913 the 
figures being 560,791 tons and 644,934 tons, respectively. 

Almost the whole of this foreign coal came to Bombay and Karachi and the 
increased tonnage was largely due to the rise in sea-freights on coal from Cal- 
cutta, which increased the cost of Indian coal at these ports to a figure which 
allowed of successful foreign competition. 

Since the end of 19 13 there has been a heavy drop in coal-freights. Offers 
of freight have been made for 191 5 at much lower rates than prevailed in 
1912 and 1913, due to ship-owners' fears that a world-wide collapse of trade 
is imminent. 

9. Exports of Indian Coal. 

As will be seen from Appendix I, the total exports. of Indian coal have not 
increased since 1907, the average being about three million tons per annum. 
Of this Indian and Ceylon Railways take about one-third, and about one-third 
goes to Indian and Ceylon ports for public consumption. 

In 191 2 and 19 1 3 there was an actual shortage of coal of good quality and 
this with the high freights prevailing prevented an increase in export. It is 
doubtful whether there will be an appreciable increase in coal exports in the next 
few years. In addition to normal competition with South African, Australian 
and Japanese coal, Indian coal is penalised by the primitive methods of loading 
employed at Kidderpore Docks, which cause a heavy breakage and consequent 
depreciation to the coal. With few exceptions most collieries might with advan- 
tage pay more attention to their loading when despatching coal to the docks 
for public shipment as there is no doubt that if inferior coal is sent to foreign 
ports Indian coal gets a very bad reputation which to a great extent is avoidable. 

10. Singareni. 

During the year those railways associated with this Department which use 
coal from Singareni colliery (Hyderabad Deccan Coal Company) complained of 
the quality of the supplies. The Coal Superintendent visited trie colliery twice 
and as a result of his report it has been decided to station an Assistant Coal Sup- 
erintendent at Singareni. It is hoped that his presence will result in a great 
improvement in the quality of despatches. 

11. Standardisation of Screening Tests. 

A Circular was sent to the Locomotive Superintendent of each Railway in 
which the following points relating to coal tests were raised : — 

1. Description of screens. 

2. Sizing of coal. 

3. Limiting percentage of small and dust, according to 

(a) class of coal 

(b) transport 

(c) type of screen. 

4. Method of screening 

5. Penalties for inferior coal. 

In regard to the kind of screens and methods of screening there is a great 
want of uniformity, but suggestions have been made to improve matters in this 
respect. 



4 



As far as penalties are concerned it is the practice to make deductions, 
based on the cost of the coal at destination in cases where an excessive amount 
of small and dust coal is received and latterly in placing contracts a preference 
has been given to those collieries which exercise most care in loading. It is im- 
possible for the inspection staff to see every wagon of coal loaded in the coal- 
fields, but when coal-owners realise that, price and quality being equal, collieries 
which despatch good clean coal will receive preferential treatment in the placing 
of contracts a great improvement should take place. 

The difficulties under which collieries labour in this respect due principally 
to the lack of trustworthy and skilled subordinates are fully realised by this de- 
partment, and it is suggested that in any scheme of technical mining education 
an attempt should be made to provide a class of men comparable to the Over- 
men and Deputy Overmen of an English Colliery. Owing to the increasing diffi- 
culties and dangers of Indian mining, managers for the more important collieries 
must be brought from Great Britain for many years to come but there is no 
reason why Indian trained Under-Managers and Assistant Managers should not 
secure all the suitable vacancies in the coal-fields. The question of trustworthy 
and intelligent subordinates is even more important for Indian collieries than it is 
in Great Britain, on account of the lack of intelligence in Indian mining labour. 

12. Use of Coke on Indian Railways. 

The enquiries instituted by this Department indicate that the approximate 
annual consumption of hard coke on Indian Railways (excluding the Fast Indian 
Railway which works a coke-making plant in connection with its collieries) is 
from 25,000 to 30,000 tons. This figure includes a large quantity of imported 
fuel. 

The supply of indigenous coke of good quality was short of the demand du- 
ring the year under review and very large prices were obtained by colliery owners 
as compared with previous years and also as compared with the price of 
steam coal. 

The present system of making hard coke at Indian collieries may be describ- 
ed as an open kiln method and is extremely primitive and wasteful. 

Two important firms of colliery owners are arranging to erect modern coke- 
making plants in the Jharria coal-field, and all possible help has been given 
by this Department. By the erection of these plants very large economies will 
be effected in the production of coke, the bye-products of the coal which are 
wasted at present will be available for use, and it should be possible to make 
coke of a quality suitable for all railway requirements thus dispensing with the 
need for imported coke. 

13. Screened Small Coal. 

The demand for screened small coal, free from dust has very largely- 
increased in recent years, owing to the introduction of modern boilers and 
mechanical stoking plants at works and manufactories in the country. 

There is no doubt that this demand will increase still further and a number 
of colliery owners have erected up-to-date screening plants. So far these plants 
have not been of great advantage on account of the constantly recurring shortage 
of wagons for coal. For a screening plant to be an economical success wagons 
must be supplied to the colliery in sufficient numbers to keep the plant busy 
during the hours in which the mine is being worked. It is trusted that when 
the wagons now under order for the railways serving the coal fields are received 
wagon-shortage will be a thing of the past. 

14. Soft Coke. 

Large quantities of coal from seams of inferior quality are partly burnt in 
heaps at the collieries, and the charred residue sold as "soft coke" for household 
and cooking purposes. There is a brisk demand for this class of fuel, (a large 
proportion of which would be more accurately described as charred carbonaceous 
shale) and good prices are realised. The by-products contained in the coal are 
lost in this method of making soft coke, but it is doubtful whether the coal is 
worth elaborate treatment. 



5 

Recently, however, various methods of low temperature distillation of coal 
have been patented, some of which it is believed are now working on a 
commercial basis. In these methods the greater proportion of the volatile 
contents of the coal are driven off under the influence of heat, giving as bye- 
products tar, various oils and ammoniacal liquors, convertible into sulphate of 
ammonia by the addition of sulphuric acid, and leaving as residue a fuel contain- 
ing about 10 per cent of volatile matter. If some of the better qualities of Indian 
coal were dealt with in this manner, there is no doubt that the resulting fuel 
would suit Indian methods of cooking, for which a smoky fuel is useless, and 
the bye-products would in all probability command a good market. 

There are certain seams of Indian coal, more especially the better qualities 
of the Raneeganj series which cannot be used to make hard or foundry coke, and 
these coals contain upwards of 35 per cent of volatile matter, with not more 
than 10 per cent of ash. Screened small coal from these seams has a ready 
sale to power installations where modern methods of firing are in use, and it is 
suggested that the slack and dust obtained after screening would be a useful 
fuel for treatment by one of the low-temperature carbonisation methods. The 
increasing cost of wood, at present the principal cooking fuel in the larger cities 
of India, opens a wide and profitable market for suitable substitutes.. 

Research work into the nature of the volatile contents of Indian coals will 
be undertaken as soon as possible at the Government Laboratory at Alipore and 
the results will be published. 

15. Spontaneous Combustion of Coal. 



Over 500 cargoes of coal are despatched from Kidderpore Docks yearly 
and a number of these are found to be on fire on arrival at destination. In 
consequence of this in recent years the premium for insurance of coal cargoes 
against fire risk has been largely increased, and some ship owners have shown 
an unwillingness to carry coal cargoes. 

While experts differ as to the real causes of spontaneous combustion, there 
seems to be little doubt, in the light of the research work of the past decade, 
that the leading factors are : — 



/. Kind of coal. — Experiment has proved that those coals richest in volatile 
matter are most liable to spontaneous combustion. In the Damuda Valley 
coal-fields the coals of the Raneeganj series contain upwards of 50 per cent more 
volatile matter than those of the Barakar series and consequently require more 
care in storage. It is well known that gases of an inflammable nature are occluded 
in coal, and while their relation to spontaneous ignition has not been clearly 
established, there is no doubt that if the coal becomes heated by oxidation or 
some other cause to a temperature high enough for the oxygen of the air to unite 
with these gases they consitute a very serious source of danger. 

2. The size of the coal. — Finely divided coal is a much more active absorbent 
of oxygen and is much more liable to spontaneous combustion than large coal. 
Experiments carried out in the Engineering Experiment station of the University 

.„., „ „„,,.,, , of Illinois* prove that fine particles of coal 

*Vide U-oM Bulletin No. 46. r 11, 

can absorb more oxygen than large lumps 
and this rapidity of absorption causes an increase in temperature producing 
favourable conditions for further absorption and greatly increasing the danger of 
spontaneous combustion. 

3. Presence of pyrites. — Opinions differ greatly as to the part sulphur 
compounds play in the spontaneous combustion of coal, and the balance of 
opinion at the present day is that they are of minor importance. The oxidising 
nature of the air upon pyrites is admitted and it would seem reasonable to 
suppose that this pyritic oxidation tends to raise the temperature of the 
coal, thereby increasing its liability to spontaneous ignition. 

4. The Temperature of the coal. — Most authors of the present day agree 
that the temperature of the coal is one of the main factors in spontaneous 
ignition. As has been explained a rise in temperature, whether from outside 

ssRB 



6 



sources or from physical and chemical reactions within the coal, tends to 
accelerate the absorption of oxygen, and to drive out the inflammable gases 
occluded in the coal, thus greatly accentuating the danger of spontaneous ignition. 

5. The Presence of moisture. — While opinions differ as to the part moisture 
in the coal plays in spontaneous combustion, it may be taken for granted that 
moisture materially assists pyritic oxidation though whether it causes an increase 
in temperature or merely a disintegration of the coal due to the formation of 
ferrous sulphate is a matter of dispute. 

6. The accessibility of oxygen. — That the combination of oxygen with 
the constituents of the coal causes a rise in temperature seems to be firmly 
established from the experiments carried out at Illinois, but which particular 
constituent is the cause of the rise in temperature has not been proved with 
any degree of certainty. The nature of the exact chemical action may be left 
to the scientist for the present, and it is sufficient to say that the presence of 
oxygen should be avoided as far as possible. The old idea of ventilating 
coal stacks and cargoes by free access of air is being dropped, and if ventilation 
is used to lower the temperature of the coal it should be through pipes, so 
that the cooling air cannot come in contact with the coal. 

7. Pressure on the coal. — Most observers now hold that pressure is one 
of the leading factors in the spontaneous ignition of coal. While it is probably 
impossible to prevent excessive pressure in the case of cargoes, a quick discharge 
of the vessel would greatly lessen the risk of fire. In dealing with coal stacked 
on land, attempts should be made to keep the stacks to a safe height, 
especially in the case of coals liable to spontaneous combustion. 

Suggestions to prevent spontaneous combustion of Indian coal, more 
particularly coal from the Damuda Valley coal-fields, may be summarised 
briefly : — 

1. Load coal as free from small and dust as possible. 

2. Do not load those portions of the seams in which iron pyrites is 

noticed. 

3. Keep steam pipes and flues and other causes of external heat away 

from the coal. 

4. As far as possible load coal in a dry condition. 

5. Do not ventilate stacks and cargoes by means of air-ways or boards 

— use pipes. 

6. Do not stack coal high in moisture and volatile matter or known to 

have a high sulphur content, in high stacks, and with cargoes 
load and discharge as quickly as possible. 

16. Purchases during 1913. 

During 1913 the price of coal of good quality remained at a high figure 
as compared with previous years, but as far as railways were concerned it did 
not reach the price paid in 1908. These high prices were partly due to the 
fact that the supply of first class coal was not equal to the demand, and partly 
to the shortage of wagons which occurred in the early part of the year. During 
a wagon shortage the price of coal is entirely fictitious as those collieries which 
can obtain wagons can fix their own price for the coal, knowing that it will be 
eagerly paid by some consumer whose supplies are in arrears. Towards the 
end of the year prices of coal fell, and those railways which have made fresh 
contracts during the first three months of 1 9 1 4 for coal to be supplied in 19 15 
have obtained their supplies at a reduced rate. 

During 191 2 it was found necessary to make large purchases of coal in 
addition to the contracted quantities on account of the extra traffic on all 
railways, but this was fortunately unnecessary in 19 13 as requirements had 
been more accurately forecasted by the Locomotive Superintendents concerned. 



17- Coal mining in India during 1913. 



The total coal mined in India during 191 3 amounted to 15,486,318 tons, 
a higher figure than had previously been reached. The figures for the years 
1904-1913 are given in Appendix I and diagram 1, and as will be seen there 
was a drop in output after 1908, which previous to 1912 was the record year 
for India. 

While the labour question is of great and increasing difficulty at Indian 
collieries there are several other causes which have prevented outputs from 
increasing in a manner commensurable with the large sums which have been 
spent on development work during the past decade. One of the principal 
causes is the injudicious manner in which collieries in the Raneeganj and Jharria 
fields — more especially the latter — were first worked. There is reason to believe 
that large quantities of coal have been wasted and still larger quantities 
lost owing to the way in which the shallower deposits were worked. This 
coal, if a sound system of mining had been adopted, should have been avail- 
able at very low raising costs. The owners of coal-companies are not the 
only sufferers by the loss of this coal, the matter affects the whole country, 
railways and manufacturers, as a cheap supply of coal is essential to a country 
which -is trying to encourage existing industries and to establish new ones. So 
long as the Indian Mines Act is worked to, Government cannot interfere in 
any system of mining colliery owners like to adopt, although it may be quite 
clear to the trained observer that enormous losses of coal will take place. It 
is to be hoped when those coal-fields which have not been worked up to the 
present are opened out colliery owners will see that mining is done in such a 
way as to ensure the minimum loss in working, as much in their own interests 
as in the interests of the country at large. 

During the year there was a general improvement in regard to the size 
and cleanliness of the coal despatched to railways but there is still room for 
improvement to bring the coal to the standard looked upon as necessary by this 
Department. At certain periods when labour was scarce in the coal-fields and 
stocks were low it required all the energies of the inspection staff to main- 
tain the quality of despatches. At one colliery steam coal was found being 
loaded from dumped coal at the wharves with shovels, and the Manager stated 
that his labourers would not work in any other way. 

There are various methods of cleaning the coal at work in the coal fields* 
Several collieries have picking belts but the usual system is for stone and 
shale to be hand-picked from the wagons during loading. The efficiency of 
any of these methods depends entirely on the supervision exercised by the 
colliery staff. In one case the Coal Superintendent found good coal being 
thrown out of a wagon by coolies who evidently expected their work to be judged 
by the quantity thrown out irrespective of quality. 

Screening plants have been erected at a number of collieries and this is 
certainly a step in the right direction. Unfortunately all Colliery Managers do not 
appear to realise that the function of screens is to prevent dust and small coal being 
despatched with steam coal, as at one colliery the screen was found fixed at such 
an angle that large coal small and dust passed over it, and at another the Manager 
had placed flat sheets over the screen. His explanation was that unless the 
holes in the screen were covered his output of steam coal was reduced. 

The collieries which give most trouble in the matter of clean coal are 
usually those where the coal is raised by a contractor at an inclusive rate per 
ton. When this contractor is paid on despatches there is a very great tempta- 
tion for him to endeavour to despatch as much slack coal as possible with the 
steam coal, as the contract rate for the latter is much greater than that for 
slack and dust coal. A number of collieries have been fined for the despatch 
of inferior coal and in some cases where fines and warnings were ignored more ser- 
ious steps have had to be taken. 

18. Government Laboratory at Alipore. 

During the year a well equipped chemical laboratory was built in connec- 
tion with the Government Test House at Alipore, and a qualified Chemist 



8 

placed in charge of the Chemical work. All coal samples taken for the De- 
partment are now sent to Alipore for analysis and in addition work has been 
undertaken for private firms principally in connection with their proposals to 
erect bye-product recovery coking plants. 

It is hoped to commence research work on Indian Coals at an early 

date. 

19. Inspection work outside the Bengal and Cbota Nagpur 

Coal Fields. 

In September 1913 Mr. Thomson, Coal Superintendent, visited and ins- 
pected Singareni collieries and a result of his work is indicated in Chap- 
ter 10. 

In November Mr. Whitworth, Assistant Coal Superintendent, visited and 
inspected Bellarpur Colliery (Central Provinces) on behalf of the Great Indian 
Peninsula Railway. 

In December Mr. Church and Mr. Whitworth visited and inspected 
Nazira Colliery (Assam) in connection with a proposed siding of the Assam 
Bengal Railway and from there went on to Margharita collieries (Assam 
Railway and Trading Company). 

20. Staff Changes up to 31st December 1913. 

During the year 1913 the following changes took place in the staff : — 

Mr. R. W. Church, Mining Engineer and Metallurgist with the Railway 
Board, proceeded in April 1 91 3 on six months' leave. During his absence Mr. 
H. L. Cole, Assistant Secretary, Railway Board, officiated for Mr. Church. 

The new post of a sixth Assistant Coal Superintendent for Singareni 
has been sanctioned and a selected candidate from Home is expected to join 
the Staff in May 1914. 

Postings of staff up to 31st December 1913. 

Mr. D. Thomson. — State Railways Coal Superintendent. 

Head Quarters, Kusunda. 

Mr. C. S. Whituwrth. — Assistant Coal Superintendent. 

From ist January 191 3 ... 

to > Jharria District. 

'ioth January 191 3 ... ) 

From 1 2th January 1913 ... ") 

to > Docks. 

17th November 1 91 3 ... } 

From 18th November 1 91 3 

to > Attached to Mining En- 

ist December 191 3 ... ) gineer's office. 

From 2nd December 1913...*) 

to > Docks. 



31st December 191 



Mr. P. A. Russell. — Assistant Coal Superintendent. 

From ist January 1913 
to 

31st December 1 9 1 3 



i Asansol Di 
• •1 J 



9 

Mr. J. J. Marshall. — Assistant Coal Superintendent. 

From ist January 1 913 

to Docks. 
1 ith January 1913 



From 14th January 191 3 ... "\ 

to >Jharria District. 

31st December 19 13 ... ) 



Mr. D. Sellers. — Assistant Coal Superintendent. Joined the Department 
on the 4th November 191 3. 

From 1 8th November 191 3 
to 

ist December 191 3 



l Docks. 



From 2nd December 1913... ^ 

to > Head Quarters. 

31st December 1913 ...3 



Mr. J. Thomas. — Assistant Coal Superintendent. Joined the Department 
on 4th November 1913. 

From 3rd December 1913 ... ~\ 

to V Attached to Asansol 

31st December 1913 ... } District. 



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APPENDIX 4. 

Coal inspected by the State Railways Coat, Department on behalf of Indian 

Railways. 



Year. 


Railborne. 


Seaborne. 


Total. 


1 9 1 1 


••• ... 


843)6' 3 


226,534 


1,070,147 


1912 




2,308,041 


698,217 


3,006,258 


1913 


• • r « .... 


2,029,668 


835,452 


2,928,120 



APPENDIX 5. 

List of Collieries inspected in 1913. 
Raniganj field. 



Name of Colliery. 


Owners. 


Managing Agents. 


B. 








Bulgaria 

D. 


Sutikdih Coal Company, Limit- 
ed. 


Messrs. jardine SUinner 
Company. 


and 


Dhobidih 

J. 


Bengal Giridih Coal Company, 
Limited. 


Messrs. Andrew Yule and 
pany. 


Com 


Jamabad ... 


East Indian Coal Company. ... 


Messrs. Jardine Skinner 
Company. 


and 


jamehari 


Searsole Raj. 


Choudhury and Company. 




N. 








Nodiha 


N. M. Choudhury and Com- 






T. 


pany. 






Topatand 


East Indian Coal Company. ... 


Messrs. Jardine Skinner 
Company. 


and 


Jharria field. 


G. 








Golukdih 


N. M. Choudhury and Com- 






L. 


pany. 






Lower Joyrampur ... 


Ghela Panchan and Company. 


Messrs. Khora Ramji and C 


om- 


Lodna Colliery (North 
Burrakar Coal Com- 


B. Bose and Company 


pany. 




pany's). 

N. 








North Jherria 


Shaikh Emamali and Kama, 
nath Bannerjee. 






North Goneshpur ... 


C. A. Forbes, Esq. 







55 RB 



'4 

APPENDIX 6. 
Tender for the Supply of Seaborne Coal. 



To The SECRETARY, 

Railway Board, 

SIMLA. 

I 

We 
of 



. , hereby tender for the supply of Coal of the 

* Not printed. . .- . . , *. r . 1 . 

description in the quantities at the rates 
and at the places set forth in the Schedule* hereto and J e agree to observe 
and be bound by the conditions following : — 

Conditions. 

(The word 'Agent' or 'Locomotive Superintendent' referred to in the following 
clauses means the Agent or Locomotive Superintendent of the North- Western Railway 
to which delivery of coal is to be made by the Contractor.) 

1. The Railway Board may accept the Tender in respect of all the coal 
tendered for or any less quantity thereof by notifying the Contractor accordingly 
in the Acceptance and the Tender shall thereupon be considered as a Tender 
for the quantity so accepted. The Tender (or such part of it) with the Accept- 
ance will form the Contract. 

2. Any sums which may become recoverable from the Contractor under any 
of the provisions of the Contract may be deducted and retained by the Agent 
from any sums which may be or become due to the Contractor by the Railway. 

3. T he quantity of coal to be delivered shall be ''more or less" ; i.e., 
the Agent shall have the option of purchasing 5 per cent in excess of or 5 per cent 
less than the contracted quantity within the period of the contract, such option to 
be declared before the expiration of three-quarters of the period of the Contract. 

4. The Contractor shall deliver the coal on the respective dates prescribed 
for the delivery thereof in the Programme of Despatches to be furnished to the 
Contractor by the Locomotive Superintendent. In the event of the Contractor's 
failure so to deliver any coal he shall pay to the Railway a sum equal to one 
per cent on the total Contract price of the coal which he shall have so failed to 
deliver, for every day not exceeding ten days during which such failure shall 
continue. 

5. In the event of such failure continuing for more than ten consecutive 
days, the Agent may after the expiry of such period either terminate the 
contract by notice in writing to the Contractor or without any notice purchase 
coal to the extent of the quantity in default from any source he may select and 
the Contractor shall pay to the Railway the amount of any loss which may be 
incurred by reason of the price paid on such purchase being above the Contract 
price and the amount of any other loss or expense which may be occasioned by 
the Contractor's failure to deliver. 

6. If the Contractor shall by any circumstance not within his control be 
hindered in the supply of the coal and shall desire an extension of the time 
allowed for delivery, he may apply in writing to the Agent who (if in his sole 
judgment such hindrance shall have been due to any circumstance as 
aforesa d and shall properly necessitate an extension) may in writing grant to 



i5 



the Contractor such extension of time for delivery as the Agent in his absolute 
discretion may think necessary or advisable and upon the grant of such exten- 
sion the dates for delivery or such of them as may be affected by such extension 
shall be deemed to be postponed accordingly. 

7. The Contractor shall give to the Agent not less than 10 days' notice 
in writing prior to making each delivery and after the coal the subject of such 
notice shall have been received a receipt therefor shall be given to the Contractor 
by the Agent and no coal shall be deemed to have been delivered until such receipt 
in relation thereto shall have been given as aforesaid, 

8. All coal transported by sea will be taken delivery of tfx-ship in accordance 
with one or other of the alternative methods mentioned in clause 16 below. 

9. The Contractor is not required to make any security deposit, but in 
order to provide for the due fulfilment of his Contract the value of one month's 
supply of coal shall be held as security month by month during the tenure of the 
Contract. When the whole of the coal shall have been delivered in manner afore- 
said and all rejected coal shall have been removed as hereinafter provided 
the Agent shall furnish to the Contractor a certificate of completion and the 
Contractor shall thereupon be entitled to receive payment of any balance which 
may be due to him under the Contract. 

10. The coal shall be in conformity in all respects with the Specification* 

, . T t ... attached hereto. 

* l\ot printed. 



11. If any coal delivered shall be considered by the Agent to be not in 
conformity in any respect with the Specification, or not the best of its kind, the 
Agent may reject such coal and the Contractor shall on demand in writing by 
the Agent remove the same at his own expense and if he shall neglect to do 
so within such period as may be named in the demand the Agent may cause 
the rejected coal to be removed or otherwise disposed of at the Contractor's risk 
and the Contractor shall pay all expenses incurred in or about such removal or 
disposition. If it be impossible to separate coal which is not in conformity 
with the contract the Agent may take over such coal at a valuation, or may make 
a deduction from the whole cargo on account of such coal, or may reject the 
whole cargo. 

12. In the event of any coal being so rejected as aforesaid the Contractor 
shall, if the Agent requires it, replace the coal rejected by other coal duly con- 
forming with the Specification within six weeks after the date of the demand 
for removal and if the Contractor shall fail to make such replacement within the 
said period the Agent may either determine the Contract by notice in writing 
to the Contractor or without any notice purchase from any source he may 
select such quantity of coal as the Contractor shall have failed to replace and 
the Contractor shall pay to the Railway the amount of any loss which may be 
incurred by reason of the price paid on such purchase being above the contract 
price and the amount of any other loss or expense which may be occasioned by 
the Contractor's failure. 

13. The Agent shall have power to inspect the coal while in course of 
being made ready for despatch for shipment and may on any such inspection 
direct the Contractor not to despatch any coal which in the Agent's opinion 
shall be not in conformity with the Specification and the Contractor shall comply 
with every such direction. The Railway Coal Superintendent and his Assistants 
shall also have access to the plans and to all the workings of the Colliery, both 
surface and underground, at such times as they may think fit. 

14. The coal shall be inspected whilst being discharged from steamers at 
Kiamari by representatives of the Locomotive and Stores Departments, and in 
case of any excessive percentage of small coal, dust, shale, stone, or moisture, 
the fact shall immediately be brought to the notice of the local Agents of the coal 
Company at Karachi and the percentage to be deducted from the bill shall be 
settled irr mediately after the unloading of the cargo has been completed. 



i6 

15. The North-Western Railway shall supply trucks or wagons to receive 
the coal as it comes ashore, but shall not be bound to accept delivery at the 
rate of more than 500 tons per day, or to supply a larger number of trucks or 
wagons in one day than is sufficient to receive 500 tons. 

16. The Agent shall have the option of taking over the coal by — 

(a) the weight as actually ascertained by passing over the weigh-bridge 

at Kiamari j 

(b) the weight less two per cent, entered on certificates of a Lloyd's 

Surveyor, or any other qualified Marine Surveyor at Kiamari. 

17. Shipment of coal for the purposes of the conditions of Contract and 
tender shall be made only in steamers which carry no coal for other consignees. 

18. The Contract shall not be assigned or sublet by the Contractor without 
the written permission of the Agent and in the event of the Contractor assigning 
or subletting the Contract or any part thereof without such permission the Agent 
may by notice in writing to the Contractor terminate the Contract. 

19. The Agent may from time to time depute to any other officer the 
exercise of any of the powers or discretions vested in the Agent under the 
Contract and may revoke any such deputation. 

20. If at any time any question, dispute or difference shall arise between 
the. Agent and the Contractor upon or in relation to or in connection with the 
Contract, either party may forthwith give the other notice in writing of the 
existence of such question, dispute or difference, and such question, dispute or 
difference shall be referred to arbitration of a person mutually agreed upon. The 
award of the Arbitrator shall be final and binding on both parties. 



Signature of Tenderer 

Signature of witness to } 
Signature of Tenderer ) 



Address 

Dated 

Tlu 191 . 



>7 

Tender for the Supply of Railborne Coal . 



To The SECRETARY, 

Railway Board, 

SIMLA. 

I 

We 
of 



. , hereby tender for the supply of Coal of 

•Not printed. . j , . • • , 

the description in the quantities at the 
rates and at the places set forth in the schedule* hereto and 1 agree to observe 

we 

and be bound by the conditions following : — 

Conditions. 

(The words ' Agent ' or ' Locomotive Superintendent ' referred to in the 
following clauses means the Agent or Locomotive Superintendent respectively of 
any of the three State Railways — North-Western, Oudh and Rohilkand and 
Eastern Bengal Railways — to one or all of which the Railway Board may order 
delivery to be made by the Contractor.) 

i. The Railway Board may accept the Tender in respect of all the coal 
tendered for or any less quantity thereof by notifying the Contractor accordingly 
in the Acceptance and the Tender shall thereupon be considered as a Tender for 
the quantity so accepted. The Tender (or such part of it) with the Acceptance 
will form the Contract. 

2 Any sums which may become recoverable from the Contractor under 
any of the provisions of the Contract may be deducted and retained by the 
Agent from any sums which may be or become due to the Contractor by the 
Railway. 

3. The quantity of coal to be delivered shall "be more or less "; i.e., the 
Agent shall have the option of purchasing 5 per cent in excess of or 5 per cent 
less than the contracted quantity within the period of the Contract, such option 
to be declared before the expiration of three-quarters of the period of the 
Contract. 

4. The coal shall be delivered in regular monthly quantities according to the 
schedule annexed hereto but the Agent shall have the option of taking jo per 
cent in excess of or 10 per cent less than such monthly quantities in any month, 
provided that the total quantity so taken is within the limits described in clause 
3 above, i.e., 5 per cent of the whole Contract. 

5. The Contractor shall deliver the coal on the respective dates prescribed 
for the delivery thereof in the Programme of Despatches to be furnished to the 
Contractor by the Locomotive Superintendent. In the event of the Contractor's 
failure so to deliver any coal he shall pay to the Railway a sum equal to one 
per cent on the total Contract price of the coal which he shall have so failed to 
deliver, for every day not exceeding ten days during which such failure shall 
continue. 

6. In the event of such failure continuing for more than ten consecutive 
days, the Agent may after the expiry of such period either terminate the 
Contract by notice in writing to the Contractor or without any notice purchase 
coal to the extent of the quantity in default from any source he may select and 
the Contractor shall pay to the Railway the amount of any loss which may be 
incurred by reason of the price paid on such purchase being above the Contract 
price and the amount of any other loss or expense which may be occasioned by 
the Contractor's failure to deliver. 



ssRB 



18 



7. If the Contractor shall by any circumstances not within his control be 
hindered in the supply of the coal and shall desire an extension of the time 
allowed for delivery, he may apply in writing to the Agent who (if in his sole 
judgment such hindrance shall have been due to any circumstance as aforesaid 
and shall properly necessitate an extension) may in writing grant to the 
Contractor such extension of time for delivery as the Agent in his absolute 
discretion may think necessary or advisable and upon the grant of such exten- 
sion the dates for delivery or such of them as may be affected by such extension 
shall be deemed to be postponed accordingly. 

8. The Contractor shall give to the Agent not less than 10 days' notice 
in writing prior to making each delivery and after the coal the subject of such 
notice shall have been received a receipt therefor shall be given to the Contractor 
by the Agent and no coal shall be deemed to have been delivered until such 
receipt in relation thereto shall have been given as aforesaid. 

9. The coal shall be delivered in railway wagons at the sidings specified in 
the Schedule hereto. 

10. The Contractor is not requ'red to make any security deposit, but in 
order to provide for the due fulfilment of his Contract the value of one month's 
supply of coal shall be held as security month by month during the tenure of the 
Contract. When the whole of the coal shall have been delivered in manner afore- 
said and all rejected coal shall have been removed as hereinafter provided the 
Agent shall furnish to the Contractor a certificate of completion and the 
Contractor shall thereupon be entitled to receive payment of any balance which 
may be due to him under the Contract. 

•Not rntod 1 f ' The coal shall De m conformity in 

all respects with the * Specification attach- 
ed hereto. 

12. If any coal delivered shall be considered by the Agent to be not in 
conformity in any respect with the Specification, or not the best of its kind, the 
Agent may reject such coal and the Contractor shall on demand in writing by 
the Agent remove the same at his own expense and if he shall neglect to do so 
within such period as may be named in the demand the Agent may cause the 
rejected coal to be removed or otherwise diposed of at the Contractor's risk and 
the Contractor shall pay all expenses incurred in or about such removal or dis- 
position. 

13. In the event of any coal being so rejected as aforesaid the Contractor 
shall replace the coal rejected by other coal duly conforming with the Speci- 
fication within 20 day? after the' date of the demand for removal and if the 
Contractor shall fail to make such replacement within the said period the Agent 
may either determine the Contract by notice in writing to the Contractor or 
without any notice purchase from any source he may select such quantity of 
coal as the Contractor shall have failed to replace and the Contractor shall pay to 
the Railway the amount of any loss which may be incurred by reason of the price 
paid on such purchase being above the Contract price and the amount of any 
other loss or expense which may be occasioned by the Contractor's failure. 

14. The weight of the coal delivered shall be reckoned according to the 
weight thereof appearing in the weigh ment bills of the Railway administration 
on whose siding the same shall be delivered, unless the Agent shall appoint an 
officer to inspect the weighment of the coal by such Railway administration, in 
which event the weight of the coal delivered shall be reckoned according to the 
weight thereof certified by such officer. In ascertaining the weight one ton 
shall be considered equivalent to twenty hundredweights and one hundred- 
weight shall be considered equivalent to 1 1 2 pounds. 

15. The Agent shall have power to inspect the coal while in course of 
being made ready for loading into wagons for delivery and may on any such 
inspection direct the Contractor not to load any coal which in the Agent's 
opinion shall be not in conformity with the Specification and the Contractor 
shall comply with every , such direction. The Railway Coal Superintendent 
and his Assistants shall also have access to the plans and to all the workings 
of the Colliery, both surface and underground, at such times as they may 
think fit. 



19 



1 6. The Contractor shall route the coal in strict accordance with the 
instructions of the Locomotive Superintendent of the Railway and in the event 
of his failure so to route any coal the Contractor shall repay to the Railway the 
amount of any freight paid by the Railway in excess of the freight which would 
have been payable in respect of such coal if the same had been routed in 
accordance with such instructions. 

17. The Contractor shall be responsible for the wagons being fully loaded. 
In the event of any wagon not being loaded to its full carrying capacity the 
Contractor shall repay to the Railway the amount of any freight paid by the 
Railway in excess of the freight properly attributable to the actual contents of 
the wagon. 

18. The Contract shall not be assigned or sublet by the Contractor without 
the written permission of the Agent and in the event of the Contractor 
assigning or subletting the Contract or any part thereof without such permis- 
sion the Agent may by notice in writing to the Contractor terminate the 
Contract. 

19. The Agent may from time to time depute to any other officer the 
exercise of any of the powers or discretions vested in the Agent under the 
Contract and may revoke any such deputation. 

20. If at any time any question, dispute or difference shall arise between 
the Agent and the Contractor upon or in relation to or in connection with the 
Contract, either party may forthwith give the other notice in writing of the 
existence of such question, dispute or difference, and such question, dispute or 
difference shall be referred to arbitration of a person mutually agreed upon. The 
award of the Arbitrator shall be final and binding on both parties. 



Signature of Tenderer 

Signature of witness to 
signature of Tenderer 



Address 



Dated 




The 



20 



APPENDIX 7. 

JHARIA COAL-FIELD. 



Alphabetical list of East Indian Railway Sidings. 
(See map No. 3.) 



No. 


Name of Sidings. 


No. 


Name of Sidings. 


24 


Angarpat lira, Khas. 


42 


Ekra Khas. 


26 


1 1 L. XT 1 

Angarpatbra, No. 1. 


70 


hna. 


25(i 


Do. iNo. i. 


8J 


Kxwnnpu tor D. A. rtar Dobari. 


256 


Do. No. 3. 


81 


Fatohpur, North. 


25c 


T\ . XT ~ 4 

Do. INo. »1. 


82 


1 1 „ i i 

Uo. Noutu. 


104 


Mgdlg] .bust. 


A O 

48 


Gansadib. 


10 > 


1 \\T L 

uo. West. 


•11 


Gararia- 


3 


Barakai Coal Com pan y s, Jamuni. 


10 


Gobindpur, North. 


77 


Balgora Coal Company s D. 


11 


Gobindpnr, South. 


78 


B. S. Balgora Coal Company s. 


60 


uouiiar, uid. 


79 


Ditto ditto. 


CL 1 

ol 


Godhar, new. 


45 


Bansdeopur. 


75 


Gopaliehuck, E. I. Railway. 


36 


liansjora and Sendra. 


O-h 


Gopalicbuck, ^Tost. 


89 


Bansjora, E. I. Railway. 


OA 

oO 


Guslitftr. 


106 


Baratee. 




Hoare Miller Coal Company's, Kantapahari. 


106a 


Bararee. 


89 


J. L. Banerjee's, Sooratand, 


106i 


Do. No. 2. 


110 


J ealgora, East. 


106c 


Do. No. 3. 


1 10a 


Uo. »» est. 


111 


Bararee, South. 


I l ri 7. 

I I Uo 


Jcalgora. 


111a 


Bararee, No. 2. 


VI 


Jhana Coal Company 's, Bhaga. 


91 


Benahir and Snratar. 


TR 
IV 


Jharia, Khas. 


68 


B. N. Coal Company s, North Bhaggutdih. 


7ba 


1 'O. -N 0. L. 


71 


B. N. Coal Company's, South Bhaggutdih. 


Of 

80 


•Jharia Khas, Phularibad. 


69 


Bhaggutdih Spur. 


no. 


J hennagurah, No. 1. 


113 


Bhulan Baraiee. 




ri/i Vict 


109 


Bhulan Bararee, No. 3. 


lui 


Tin Wnct 

i-^o. I, est. 


17 


Bird and Company's, Chaytudib. 


1ft.) 


UO. . o. 2. 


112 


Brahmau Bararee. 


1 3 


Uo. Si o. o. 


32 


Budnichuck. 


34 


Jogta. 


56 


Bulliari. 


108 


•Toyrampur, Nortn. 


92 


Bun 


xuoa 


iJ\J. *1 u. i. . 


43 


Busserya New. 




Uo. ftoucn. 


44 


Busserya. 


90 


K. B. Seal's, Kalithan. 


52 


Central Kerkend, South. 


65 


K. and N. Nos. 1 and 2. 


53 


Ditto North. 


65a 


Ditto No. 3. 


57 


Dbcria Joba. 


654 


Ditto Nos. 4 and 5. 


6 


E. L Railway, Budoora. 


65 c 


Ditto No. 6. 


115 


E. I. Railway Stabling. 


65a* 


Ditto No. 7. 


94 


East Jh»ria Coal Company's, Golukdih. 


38 


Kankane. 


50 


East Kerkend Coal Company's. 


47 


Kendwadih, No. L 



21 



JHA11IA COAL-FIELD — contd. 
Alphabetical list of East Indian Railway Sidings — coutd. 
(See map No. 3.) 



Name of Sidings. 



Keiulwadib, No. 2. 

Do. No. 3. 
Kerkend Railway. 
Kesurgurra Coal Company's. 
Khanudih Loop. 
Khora Ramjee's. 
Kiska, old Nos. 1 and 2. 
Kujma. • 
Kusunda, New. 
Lakurka. 
Lodna, No. 1. 

Lodna No. 2, Turner Morrison and Company's. 

Ditto No. 3., ditto. 
Lodna No. 4. 
Lower Khoira. 
Loyabad, No. 1. 

Do. No. 2. 

Do. No. 3. 

Do. No. 4. 
Marine Coal Company's. 
Messrs. M. V. Apcar and Company's. 
Jlethas. 

Moodidih, North. 

Moodidih, South. 

Mr. K. M. and Company's. 

Muheshpnr and Kharkharee. 

Mulkeera. 

Naktitan. 

Nawagarh. 

Nawagai li, No. 1. 

Do. No. 2. 
Najadih. 

New Beerbhum Coal Company's, Bastakola- 

North Barari Coal Company's, Upper Lodna- 

North Tituria. 

North-west. 

P. C. Roy, Sooratar. 

Parlead. 

Phoenix Coal Company's. 



No. 



o 
72 

85 

59 

64 

28 

28a 

37 

33 

31 

9 
88 

1 

12 
14 

35 
18 
16 
8 
95 
29 
46 
13 



Name of Sidings. 



Phularitand. 

Proposed siding to servo B. N. Coal 
Company's, new pit Nos. 1 and 2. 

Ramjas Sonalibad. 

R. C. As., Gundhoodih. 

R. C. As., Ku store. 

Reliance, South. 

Reliance. 

Sendra. 

Sijooah. 

Sijooah Southern Alignment. 
Sonardih, 

£ tandard Coal Company, Darbay. 

Sudreadih Coal Company's. 

Tentulia, North. 

Tentulia, South. 

Tetulmari. 

Tituria. 

Tituria, South. 

Toudoos. 

Turner Morrison and Company's, Modhuban. 
Union Coal Company's, Northern Alignment. 
Upper Khoira. 

West Tituria Coal Company's South. 



65P.B 



0. 

2'J 
30 
31 
32 
51 
34 
25 
■17 
40 
11 
73 

58 

3 
12 
14 
21 
28 
57 
23 
37 
43 
48a 

1 

2 
65 
06 
67 
68 
11 

9 

0a 

96 
Vc 
<Jd 
9e 
5 

59 

42 



22 



JHARIA COAL-FIELD-^d. 

Alphabetical list of Bengal Nag pur Railway Sidings. 
(Sco map No. 3. — Sidings shown thus (4).) 



Name of Bidingi. 



No. 



Balliari, Nos. 14 and 15, Balliari Coal Concern. 

Do. No. 11, Balliari Coal Concern. 

Do. No. 12 Ditto. 

Do. No. 13, Chuui Lai Coal Company. 
Barak ur Coal Company's Kankani Property. 
Bhaga connection 

Bhagaband, No. 9, Heilger'a and Company. 

Bhaga band, No. 10, Goolzad & Sons. 

Bhaggatdih. 

Do. Nos. 56 and 5c. 

Bhatdeeh, No. 3 for Modhridih Coal Company 
extension. 

Blielatand, No. 18 for Tata Iron and Steel 
Company. 

Bhojudih Pathardib connection. 

Bhowra Jamadhoba connection. 

Bhulan Barari, No. 5. 

Bhutgoiia, No. 5, Aldih Coal Couipanj'. 

Borrea Coal Company, No. 17. 

Bodroo Chuck, No. 17. 

Bnrragurh,Nos. la and 16 extension. 

Borragnrh, No. la, Bbalgon Coal Company. 

Central Kirkend, No. 19a. 

Ditto No. 19. 

Chasnalla, No. 4. 

Ditto No. 1. 

Dharmabund, No. 4. 

Do. extension. 

Do. No. 3, D. W. Ghose and Brothers 
Do. No. 2, A. K. Ghose. 
Doongree. 

Eastern Coal Company, No. 2. 



Ditto 


Ditto 


No. 


3. 


Ditto 


Ditto 


No. 


1. 


Ditto 


Ditto 


No. 


5. 


Ditto 


Ditto 


No. 


5a. 


Ditto 


Ditto 


No. 


6. 



Empire Coal Company's, No 3. 
Gaslutan, No. 10. 

Gopaleechuck Cral Company, No. 6. 



38 
4 
70 

3G 
15 
16 
17 
20 
13 
46 
26 
10 
55 
24 
8 
44 
49 
51 
47 
SO 
45 
62 
60 
52 
74 
75 



Name of hidings. 



19 

63 
64 



Gopali Chuck Coal Company's, No. 16. 

Gujrat Coal Company's, No. 2. 

Huntadih Colliery, No. 1, Shaw Wallace and 
Company. 

Hurriladih Coal Company, No. 2. 

Indian Colliery, Syndicate No. 1. 

Ditto Ditto No. 2. 

Ditto Ditto No. 2a. 

Indian Colliery, Syndicate No. 4. 
Indian Colliery, Syndicate, No. 4 (temporary). 
Jardine's Balliari, No. 1. 
Jardine's Balliari, No. 2. 
Jorapokhur. 

Kankani, No. 9, Eastern Coal Company. 

Kenwadih, No. 7, Aldih Coal Company. 

Khanoodih Katras connection. 

Kilburn, No. 7, Eaniganj Coal Association. 

Kirkend, No. 8 extension. 

Kirkend Coal, Syndicate (New) No. 8. 

Khoira Parbad connection. 

Koradih, No. 2. 

Kustore, No. 7a, Kaniganj Coal Association. 
Lakurka Coal Company, No. 2. 
Lakurka, No. 4, Nowagaih Coal Company. 
Loyabad, No. 20. 

Mocheoraiedeeh, No. 1, Bagram Company's. 

Mocheeraiedeeh. Nos. 3 and 3a, Mocheeraieueeh 
and Kaneedih Coal Company's. 



61 


Mulkera Katras connection. 




71 


Murlideeh, No. 1, Bengal Coal Company's. 


71a 


Do. 


No. la 


ditto 


ditto. 


716 


Do. 


No. U 


ditto 


ditto. 


71e 


Do. 


No. 2 


ditto 


ditto. 


7ld 


Do. 


No. 3 


ditto 


ditto. 


71c 


Do. 


No. 3a 


ditto 


ditto. 


18 


Noonoodih, No 3, Be 


ngal Iron 


and Steel Com- 



pany. 

Noonoodih, No. 3a, Bengal Iron and Steel Com- 
pany. 

Nowagarh Coal Company, No. 1. 
Ditto ditto No. 3. 



vo- 
te 
77 
78 
79 
33 
69 
50 

76 
56 
43 
39 
72 
22 
35 
6 
7 
8 



23 



JHABIA. COAL-FIELD— conoid. 
Alphabetical list of Bengal Nagpur Railway Sidings — contd. 
(See map No. 3, — Sidings shown thus (4s).) 



Name of Sidings. 



Pandakanali Coal Company, No. 15. 
Pecprand (temporary). 

Do. Colliery, No. 2. 

Do. do. No. 3. 

Pootkee, Nos. 16 and 16a, Eastern Coal Company 

Puddoogora, No. j, Bengal Coal Company. 

Putaba, Nos. 11, 12 and 13, Mackinon Macken- 
zie, Central Kirkend and Gopalichuck 
Company's. 

Eaneedih Colliery, No. 1- 

Sejooah connection. 

Simlabahal, No. 5. Bhalgora Coal Company. 
Simlabahal, No. 5a. 
Singra, No. 5. 
Soorgujia, No. 18. 
Standard Coal Company, No. 3. 
Sudamdih, No. 3, Empire Coal Company. 
Sudikdih, No. 6, East Indian Coal Company. 
Swardib, No. 2, Nand Lai Gorai. 



No. 



Name of Sidings. 



24 

RANIGANJ COAL-EIELD. 



Alphabetical list oj East Indian llaihoay Sidings. 
(See map No. 4.) 



No. 


Name of Sidings. 


No. 


Name of Sidings. 


la 

7 


Adgaicorc hast Indian Kail way s. 


00 


Bhuskajoria. 


37 


Adjai Siding pit, No. 1. 


17 


B. I. and b. Company s, Kendwab. 


37a 


Ditto No. 2. 


18 


15. J. and S. Company s, Kulth. 


376 


Ditto No. 3. 


21 


Bonjaman Coal Company s, Dendwa. 


127 


Akalpore, No. 1. 


23 


Borea Coal Company s, Balanpur. 


127a 


Ditto No. 2. 


19 


Borea. 


1276 


Ditto No. 3. 


48 


/II' 

Calajora. 


113 


B. and Company'.';, Ondal. 


132 


Chaia, No. 2. 


114 


Babasol, No, 1. 


133 


Ditto No. 1. 


115 


Ditto No. 2. 


45 


Cbaranpur, Old. 


78 


Bamondia East. 


47 


Cbaranpur, New. 


104 


Ban alee. 


47a 


Ditto. 


138 


Bankola, No. 1. 


4,7b 


Cbaranpur, No. 3. 


138a 


Ditto No. 2. 


63 


Cnanchmia New or Joyramdanga, No. 4. 


43 


Banksimula. 


101 


Cheloce. 


120 


Bansra. 


64 


Chincliuria. 


75 


Baradhemo, North. 


65 


Cnota JMuni. 


76 


Baradhemo. 


89 


Chuttaputta East. 


33 


Barool. 


35 


Damoodarpur. 


51 


Baroboni. 


86 


Dhadka. 


49 


Barabani Poonchara. 


50 


Dcinobani Loop. 


26 


Barakar Coal Company's. 


99 


Dumra, New. 


8 


Barakar Coal Company s, Kumardhun. 


87 


L. 1. Railway. 


125 


Basantipur. 


27 


J. Kailway. 


116 


Bassora. 


111 


Ji. 1. Kailway, Damuda Una.. 


10 


B. C. Company s, Laikdih. 


15 


x,. 1. B. Loop. 


11 


B. C. Company's, Doomarkunda. 


22 


L. 1. K. Loop. 


12 


B. C. Company's, South Laikdib. 


79 


1 T T» T 

L. I. K. Loop. 


13 


B- C. Company s, Chanch. 


95 


Jfi. 1. Kailway Loop. 


6 


B. C. Company's, Gurphal Baree. 


90 


E. I. Railway, Niga. 


54 


B. C. Company's assisted. 


88 


E. L Kailway, West Kissengunge. 


16 


B. C. Company's, Looohibad. 


44 


Faridpur. 

* 


80 


B. C. Company's, Pit No. 8. 


46 


F;iridpur. 


81 


Ditto No. 7. 


135 


Gaigbatta. 


82 


Ditto No. 6. 


97 


Ghoosick, No. 1. 


108 


Bengal Coal Company's. 


94 


Ditto No. 2. 


109 


Ditto ditto. 


93 


Ghoosick, To. 3. 


112 


Bengal Pappr Mill. 


91 


Ghoosick Muslia. 


139 


Bbatmora. 


98 


Ghoosick, New. 



25 

ltANIGANJ COAL-FIELD— tfnrfd, 
Alphabetical list of East Indian Railway Sidings -contd. 
(Seo inap No. <L.) 



No. 


Nume of Sidings. 


No. 


Name ol' Sidings. 


DA 


(jllOOSlC'lv ^\ est. 






OO 


Gopalpur. 


A. 


Mug ma, New. 


/I 


Guupat and Kedar Ntttn oil mill. 


0 


DjMO, \)\(X. 


61) 


Hat uarooi, No. 1. 


(19 


JVluslia, Wo. 7. 


7<l 


Ditto JNo. <s. 




Narsauiuda Distellety. 


'.•>•> 


H urdoolio. 




ii lmcod. 




I 1 urnpore. 


luo 


Niiuoha, East. 


929 


Jaintipur. 


01 


Nowpara. 




J ami iad. 


so 


Nowpara Khas. 


•in 


Jauig'ram Now. 


r,n 
ou 


Nowpara, South. 


ol 


Ditto *Jlu. 


oo 


JM unai. 


1< ',1 


Jamcliari. 




Nuni. 


'30 


Jauiuria. 


0/ 


Pancbgatcliiu. 9 


30/1 
OJU 


Jarouna cxtousion o aud 0 pits. 


190 

JL Cii) 


Parasia. 


1 17 


J otc J ankii 




i annual l. 


58 


Joy ram Jang a. 


C8 


Polashdiba . 


55 


Joy vamdan^a, No* 1* 


lis 


Praiikisseiu 


57 




41 


i ici'-ii i.i r ll, 




Joyraindanga, No. 3. 


OO 


Kajpur Nunui. 


77 


.1 llffmini n onn H ol(TM/iH It ■' f kl in I 'r 1 11 w 
»J UJ^J£ UU1 11 tlM'.l JXclgrlv-'U pi (tpUl tJ t >>• 


i in 


KfttnrftiUt 


1 'IK 


Kajora. 


i jn 


Sam la. 


3 


lYdUgd dllU v>>UIjjpckII> b) OUttttiUtil • 


1^7 
10/ 


Sankarpur. 




Kautapahari, No. 2. 


8.3 


Q nM l« 

Santa. 




unto x>o. i. 


l-O 


Sarthakpur, New, 




Katras Jbaria, No. 1. 


191 


Sat ak pur. 




l^HLO ii 0. 


l n? 
1 u/ 


Soarsoal. 




JJ1U0 JNO. 6. 


o4 


Shaikpur. 


/in.. 


T "\ ■ i J. XT „ | 

JJlttO JNO. 4. 


25 


fit _ . . .»! 

ohamdib. 


i on 

loU 


Kenda. 


1 


Shampur, No. 1. 




JA.crtni. 


la 


IJitto No. 2. 


9 
a 


Khooseri Railway. 


16 


IJitto JNo. 3. 


Ki2 


Kuardih. 


lc 


Ditto No. 4. 


100 


Kuardih, Pit No. 3. 


20 


Shergarli. 


128 


Kusumdanga. 


119 


Singaran. 


9 


M.N. Mondal's, Barmoori. 


73 


Sudi. 


53 


Maharaja's Khas. 


71 


Sudi, South. 


52 


Maharaja's K hau, No. 2. 


72 


Sudi, North. 


24 


Manbhum Coal Company's, Dhoondabad New. 






126 


Mandalpur. 







No. 

2 
!> 
1 

7 
5 

28 
23 
26 
27 
11 
3 
15 
16 
17 
IS 
13 
19 
20 
21 
22 
21 
2a 
10 
11 
28 

6 

4 

12 

8 



2G 



It AN IG AN J COAL-FIELD-cohcW. 

Alpabetical list of Benytd Nagpur Railway Sidings. 
(See map No. 4— Sidings shown thus (2)). 



Nunie of Sidings. 



AMih liuweli. 

liainandass Mukeiji, No. 3-0. 
Bejdib, Maoneill and Company. 
Bengal Coal Company, No. 2. 
Bengal Coal Company, No. 2-1!. 
Bengal Coal Company, No. 7. 
Bengal Coal Company, No. 8-B. 

Ditto Ditto No. 8-C. 

Ditto Ditto No- 8. 
Bengal Coal Company, No. 10. 
Bengal Coal Company's to serve, Pit No. 8. 
B. N. Coal Company, No- 4-A. 

Ditto ditto No. 4. 

Ditto ditto No. 5. 

Ditto ditto No. 5-A. 
Chota Dliomo Colliery. 
Equitable Coal Company, No. 9. 



Ditto 


ditto 


No. 6-A. 


Ditto 


ditto 


No. 6-B. 


Ditto 


ditto 


No. 6. 



Equitable Coal Company, No. 6«C 

Incline;, Nos. 3 and 4. 

M. I* Laik Coal Company, No. 3-B. 

"Ditto ditto No. 3-D. 

M, L. Laik Coal Company, Hatnal, No. 8 A, 
G. B. Sarcar 



C G. B. Sarcar } No. 
Moutbdih Coal Companv i and >2-A 
(J. G. Cbattcrji ) 

Radha Xa|rar for Bengal Coal Company. 

R. B. Cbatterji, No. 3. 

R. B. Chstterjee, No. 3-A. 



No. 



Name of SidingH. 



55RB— 400— 18-6-14-GCBP Simla 



voys utilizing the Services of 
te Railways Coal Department. 



KH 



ND I A 

ROUTING OF RAIL- BORNE 
COAL SUPPLIES. 



MAP 



Scale- 1 'inch = 160 mites. 



OKRUG**" • — " 



\ 5 \\PH0DY0TNA6AR E BADAHPu* / 




SAIKHOA CHAT 



ASSAM 




PAHA^TALI 

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JHARIA & RANIGANJ COAL-FIELDS. 



Scale -I 'inch = /0 mi/es 





map m z. 




Yeofma/ 




MAP SHOWING 

§SI THE PRINCIPAL COAL-FIELDS 

OF 

INDIA 

IN RELATION TO 

NG A ND PROJECTE D RAILWAYS. 

1913. 

Scale-/ /rich = 64 miles. 



iNizomab* 

E 



>-6 Gauge Railway 

Vet re... » „ , , , 

?-6."....„ „ ^ 

!u net ion 2 Gauges. 

Engine Changing Station 

n ,oal field. 

ge ( ^rov/ncia/ Boundary. .... 

*Hyt 



REFERENCES. 

Double Single Under Con : Survey 



Allahabad Z 



H^°Por Cap P amgon j 



Jholpur 



1 V 




„Roxau/ 



MAP m 2. 



^07 



E/2 




\ 1 ' 



fjubbulpor' 



MB* ^ 



2 



V ' L ' ■ — -~"! ^; 



Sar/tk Mand/o 



■5t 



2> 



,<j7 




,4» 



E 

J^ondia 



Hi 



RAIGARH 



TJharsuguda 

E 



«7 W < 



' Yeotmol 



E. 



Abhonpur 
dbamtari , 



J 




Talband 8 



R(l S S 



Sonpu 



TOLCHER* 



■^iagaSrr 



u — ) 



Russelkonda \ >^"(_ 



1 \ 



E 



jr 1 



f Hyderabad 



E 

Kozipet 



DornakaT 
1 



, CHERV.A 



r 

Vizianagram 



N 



/Pa/asa 

E 



E 

Waltaif \ 



yis/m//pafom 
rViza§rapatom 



MAP SHOWING 

THE PRINCIPAL COAL-FIELDS 

OF 

INDIA 

IN RELATION TO 

EXISTING A ND PROJECTE D RAILWAYS. 

1913. 

Sea le-l inch = 64 wiles. 

REFERENCES. 

S-6 Cauge Roi/nay ?f, U nf Single UnderCon : Sumy 
Metre. »» „ 

^s:...,, l".v„" 

Junction 2 Gauges. 
Engine Changing Siation 

Coal fie/d. 

Proline i a/ Boundary. ... 




Allah abat/l. 



MAP N 23. 




MAP N ft 3. 




MAP NR 4. 



RMLWAY SIDINGS MAP 

OF THE 

RANIGANJ COAL-FIELD. 



Scale Z mch- I mile. 




DIAGRAM I 




Diagram show/ng-.- 

(/) - Cool mined in India since IS04 
(2) —Coal consumed on Railways since 1 904 

MILLIONS OF TONS. 

<fi -4 CD CO 



DIAGRAM I 



5 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS UHBANA 




3 0112 110331441 



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